European Journal of Rheumatology
Literature Review

Relationship between diet and ankylosing spondylitis: A systematic review

1.

Epidemiology Group, University of Aberdeen School of Medicine, Medical Sciences and Nutrition, Aberdeen, UK;Medicines Monitoring Unit, University of Dundee School of Medicine, Dundee, UK

2.

Epidemiology Group, University of Aberdeen School of Medicine, Medical Sciences and Nutrition, Aberdeen, UK.

3.

Pain Concern, Edinburgh, UK

4.

Epidemiology Group, University of Aberdeen School of Medicine, Medical Sciences and Nutrition, Aberdeen, UK;Department of Public Health, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany

5.

Epidemiology Group, University of Aberdeen School of Medicine, Medical Sciences and Nutrition, Aberdeen, UK;Aberdeen Centre for Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Health, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK

Eur J Rheumatol 2018; 5: 45-52
DOI: 10.5152/eurjrheum.2017.16103
Read: 5401 Downloads: 1468 Published: 03 September 2019

Abstract

 

The question of whether diet plays a role in the onset of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) or can affect the course of the disease is an important one for many patients and healthcare providers. The aims of this study were to investigate whether: 1) patients with AS report different diets to those without AS; 2) amongst patients with AS, diet is related to severity; 3) persons with particular diets are less likely to develop AS; 4) specific dietary interventions improve the AS symptoms. The review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, and reference lists of relevant articles were searched. Two authors independently selected eligible studies, assessed the quality of included trials, and extracted the data. Sixteen studies (nine observational and seven interventions) were included in the review. Due to the heterogeneity of the study designs and analyses, the results could not be aggregated. Evidence on a possible relationship between AS and diet is extremely limited and inconclusive due to the majority of included studies being small, single studies with moderate-to-high risk of bias, and insufficient reporting of results.

 

Cite this article as: Macfarlane TV, Abbood HM, Pathan E, Gordon K, Hinz J, Macfarlane GJ. Relationship between diet and ankylosing spondylitis: a systematic review. Eur J Rheumatol 2018; 5: 45-52.

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